Monday, September 26, 2016

1975 Fisti Awards

[Images May Be Enlarged by Clicking on Them]

1975.  I feel like I say this a lot, but WHAT A YEAR!  I personally wasn't prepared for how awesome this year would turn out to be, but it just kept getting better and better.  It felt like every auteur was delivering career best work, between Kubrick, Kurosawa, Antonioni, Tarkovsky, Spielberg, Lumet and Wier, not to mention some phenomenal achievements by the likes of Truffaut, Huston, Forman and Altman; and that's just the guys that wound up gracing my Directors Dozen.

1975 was also a tremendous year for women's stories, with films like The Story of Adele H, Hester Street, Grey Gardens, A Brief Vacation and Jeanne Dielman centering on strong portrayals of women in varying situations.

The 70's get knocked around a lot as being a decade of films that...feel very dated, and I get that.  There was a lot of politically centered films that feel very much 'a part of the times' and sometimes those particular films can be hard to embrace in a more modern setting, but this year is just so full of riches of all genres.  The snubs were painful...VERY painful, as films like Dog Day Afternoon, Picnic at Hanging Rock and The Story of Adele H got the shaft, but at the end of the day I'm very happy with the final ballot, and I hope you are too.

With that said, I present to you the Fisti Awards of 1975!




















Award's Tally

[7 Wins]

Barry Lyndon

[3 Wins]

Jaws

[2 Wins]

The Mirror
Nashville

[1 Win]

Dog Day Afternoon
The Rocky Horror Picture Show
The Story of Adele H

88 comments:

  1. Yes to the Jaws, Rocky Horror, and One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest love!

    I hated Picnic at Hanging Rock but I 100% agree with a cinematography nomination.

    I probably haven't begged you to come back to twitter lately, so consider this another reminder of my begging. lol

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    1. So glad you're a Rocky Horror fan! That film is such a cult classic for all the best reasons! It was also very close to a BP nom for me.

      I think about returning to Twitter often.

      Maybe soon.

      You'll be one of the first to know when I do :-D

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  2. 1975, that was a great fucking year. Jaws, Rocky Horror, Shampoo, Barry Lyndon, The Passenger, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Jeanne Dielman, The Story of Adele H., Nashville, The Mirror. You can't go wrong with a lot of these picks.

    I think the best film of 1975 would be Jeanne Dielman with Best Director and original screenplay going to Chantal Akerman. Best Actress prize would be a tie for me to Delphine Seyrig for Jeanne Dielman and Isabelle Adjani for The Story of Adele H.. Cinematography, art direction, and costume design easily goes to Barry Lyndon while I would pick Jack Nicholson for Best Actor for both One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and The Passenger while the latter gets my pick for editing. Best Supporting Actor would go to John Cazale for Dog Day Afternoon as that guy doesn't get a lot of love while Best Supporting Actress would be Ronnee Blakeley for Nashville. Makeup and music would go to Rocky Horror as would the sound. There's so many great fucking movies that year.

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    1. I admired Jeanne Dielman a lot...but I can't say that I...loved it. For anyone who thinks Barry Lyndon was long, I suggest they stay FAR away from Jeanne Dielman. That being said, it's a great win because it's without question a great film.

      LOVE the rest of your wins, though.

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    2. If they think those 2 films are long.... then they haven't seen Satantango.

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  3. This is going to be one of those years were we are miles apart, except in two key categories.

    Picture:
    We share a few titles between your long list and my noms though I’ve yet to see The Mirror nor Dersu Uzala. But we’re going to differ a great deal because your winner Barry Lyndon, a film you obviously love, I think is a beautiful looking, far too stately incredible bore. I have TRIED multiple times through the years and given it many chances since its fans are very fervid in their devotion but each time I can’t wait for it to end.

    My Choices:
    Dog Day Afternoon-Winner
    Jaws
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    Picnic at Hanging Rock
    Three Days of the Condor
    Runners-Up-The Day of the Locust, Report to the Commissioner

    A fantastic year for which the wrong film won in all categories. Cuckoo's Nest is a good film but would be my fifth choice in every category it competes in. Each time I watch Condor I like it more and more, it would be in a tight race for second with Picnic at Hanging Rock but Dog Day is just too special to not take the prize.

    Director:
    I haven’t seen two of your directors’ efforts but of the other three there’s no question Spielberg hit his long stride with Jaws, as engrossing as it is scary. The Passenger did nothing for me, it was just another hunk of cinema with good work by Nicholson. Kubrick directs BL with a very painterly eye but for me it’s a series of static pretty pictures.

    My Choices:
    Milos Forman-One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    Sidney Lumet-Dog Day Afternoon
    Sydney Pollack-Three Days of the Condor
    Steven Spielberg-Jaws
    Peter Weir-Picnic at Hanging Rock-Winner

    Lumet was on such a run in the mid-70's which continued with Dog Day but I fell for the swoony, seemingly innocent aura laced with menace that Weir creates in Hanging Rock on first viewing and to this day makes it such a unique viewing experience.

    Actor:
    So far apart everywhere else and so close here since all of your nominees are at least either in my main list or runner-ups and we match! Pacino is so brilliant in Dog Day, I wish he had won so we could have been spared the sight of him being awarded for the dreadful Scent of a Woman years later.

    My Choices:
    Tim Curry-The Rocky Horror Picture Show
    Michael Moriarty-Report to the Commissioner
    Al Pacino-Dog Day Afternoon-Winner
    Robert Redford-Three Days of the Condor
    James Whitmore-Give 'Em Hell, Harry!
    Runner-Ups- Michael Caine- The Man Who Would Be King, Sean Connery-The Man Who Would Be King, James Coco-The Wild Party, Gene Hackman-Night Moves, Jack Nicholson-One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

    A packed category and it was so hard to bypass both Redford's involving work in Condor and Whitmore's amazing one man show as Truman but this may just be Pacino's best performance in a career of stellar work.

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    1. Ok, so first things first...I never got ahold of the Allen Bates film I wanted to...and Netflix also would not send me The Maids or Give 'Em Hell Harry...and I had Three Days of the Condor in my queue and it was the last film to see...and then I got impatient and I decided to skip the film and post these.

      I probably should have waited...but, I can always edit later when I see it.

      So, of your remaining four BP noms, DUH I love them because they are all in my Top 12.

      Sad that The Passenger did nothing for you. I find it so haunting. Love that you give Weir the win. VERY inspired direction and he was #6 for me.

      So...I haven't seen three of your nominees for Best Actor, which makes me sad, but I love that you nom Curry!!!

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    2. Condor is definitely a must see. It's one that I liked the first time I saw it and grew in my estimation with each successive view. The source novel, The Six Days of the Condor, is an excellent read as well and the adaptation of it is so good because it keeps all the pertinent elements while streamlining it for the screen.

      Report to the Commissioner is also very worth seeking it. It's a small film that I just stumbled across and it was one of those great times when you discover an unexpected gem. The film has a very 70's feeling reminiscent of Serpico.

      The same thing happened with Stormy Monday, different year but equally under the radar but surprisingly excellent.

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    3. Looks like I have more to watch!

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  4. Actress:
    Our match-up isn’t nearly as close as in Actor but our result is the same! Carol Kane is so precise in Hester Street, it’s particularly striking being familiar with her natural eccentric personality. She was in my main list for so long but moved to sixth once I saw The Maids and moved Fletcher and she to also rans to make room for Glenda Jackson & Susannah York. Sarandon’s work in Rocky Horror is delightful but Tim Curry eclipses everyone else in that film.

    My Choices:
    Isabelle Adjani-The Story of Adele H.-Winner
    Karen Black-The Day of the Locust,
    Glenda Jackson-The Maids
    Rachel Roberts-Picnic at Hanging Rock
    Susannah York-The Maids
    Runner-Ups-Louise Fletcher-One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Julie Harris-The Hiding Place, Carol Kane-Hester Street

    Another stacked category and while the duo of Glenda Jackson & Susannah York provide an acting workshop in The Maids and the other ladies give marvelous performances no one comes close to matching Adjani.

    Supporting Actor:
    Dreyfuss is a terrific winner, the category is so full he ended up sixth for me but both he and Shaw make invaluable contributions to making Jaws the compelling experience it is. Meredith does well in Day of the Locust but I’ve never been a big fan of his and like most of his work this performance didn’t knock me out.

    My Choices:
    John Cazale-Dog Day Afternoon
    Brad Dourif-One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    Charles Durning-Dog Day Afternoon-Winner
    John Houseman-Three Days of the Condor
    Oliver Reed-Tommy
    Runner-Ups-Richard Dreyfuss-Jaws, Robert Shaw-Jaws

    I love Houseman’s cool clarity as the agency head in Condor and Reed’s unbridled work in the equally unbridled Tommy but when it came down to it I was torn between the wonderfully talented but short-lived Cazale and the great Durning who was consistently excellent through the years and terrific in Dog Day. Both stand out but Durning’s role is more complex and for his playing of those complexities he gets the prize.

    Supporting Actress:
    And now we come to it…Nashville. I don’t like that film and by that I mean I hate it. I’m variable on Altman, when I connect to his films-Gosford Park, M*A*S*H, A Wedding-I’m a big fan when I don’t I find them execrable as I did Nashville. Still despite my extreme dislike of the movie the three women at its center moved me. But of those three Ronee Blakely was my least favorite, though none were anywhere close to being my winner.

    My Choices:
    Ann-Margret-Tommy
    Barbara Feldon-Smile-Winner
    Lee Grant-Shampoo
    Goldie Hawn-Shampoo
    Lily Tomlin-Nashville
    Runners-Up-Ronee Blakely-Nashville, Barbara Harris-Nashville

    The other three women were outstanding but this was between Ann-Margret's fierce, go for broke Nora that utilizes all of her considerable talents and Barbara Feldon's crazed pageant director Brenda. Ann-Margret succeeds on excess, there really is no other way to play the role but Brenda could have easily been a shrew, Feldon though sly restraint makes her hysterical in every sense of the word.

    Even though I’m not a fan of the overall film I completely agree with all the tech awards for Barry Lyndon, except the Adapted Screenplay-there’s so many excellent ones this year and I lean towards Three Days of the Condor as the winner. In those aspects it is a superior film.

    And there could not possibly be any other choice than Jaws for Original Score, without it the picture would have been just another pretty good adventure missing the component that pulled the whole thing together.

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    1. Adjani was the only option here. Her performance was riveting personified. What a true star turn.

      Durning was my runner-up, and honestly was my winner for years, but the more I rest on Dreyfuss's turn the more I love it for the ease and natural humor he brings to it. He's such a believable guy, through and through. I felt like I knew him.

      Now...let's talk Nashville. I...am not completely with you, but I'm kind of with you. I watched Nashville fully aware I was supposed to love it and found myself struggling to understand why. It was fun in many parts, but it never felt like the wonder it was supposed to feel like. As an ensemble piece, I adore it, but when it was over I didn't feel this strong connection to it. I don't feel the urge to see it again. But I didn't hate it, and Blakely SLAYED me. She broke my heart with her slip into mental breakdown. Such a brave performance.

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    2. The acting categories this year were so strong that the Cuckoo's Nest sweep really cut them short. Fletcher does well but I had no problem plucking her out to make room for Glenda & Susannah. Carol Kane was a much tougher decision-it was between she and Karen Black for that last slot but even as brilliant as the two Maids actresses are Adjani's work is just so titanically deep she's untouchable. One of the great losing performances on par with Gena Rowlands in Woman Under the Influence.

      That's really a shame that you weren't able to get a hold of The Maids. Don't give up though-it's a challenging picture to like but the performances make it essential.

      You didn't say if you'd seen Smile or not but I'd recommend it if you haven't. Obviously for Barbara Feldon's performance but it's also a fascinating time capsule on something that was very niche at the time, child beauty pageants, which is unfortunately far too prevalent now. Michael Ritchie had such a wildly erratic career but he does excellent work with this.

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    3. I know, I was really upset that I couldn't get my hands on The Maids, although I LOVE my Actress ballot, so I'd probably have been sad to knock anyone off.

      Black...is good in The Day of the Locust...but it's not a performance I love. In fact, I kind of hate the movie, and really only loved Meredith and Sutherland, but Black, in retrospect, is admirable. Still, she's probably #12 for me and no where near as impactful as Kane was (IMHO).

      But, yes...there is Adjani and no one else.

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  5. I'm right with you...what a year! And there are a number of films nominated here I still need to see, as usual, like Barry Lyndon and Amacord. That said, my BP ballot would read:

    Jaws (my winner)
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    The Rocky Horror Picture Show (love the acting noms it got)
    Dog Day Afternoon
    Monty Python and the Holy Grail

    I would definitely have nommed James Coburn in Supporting Actor for Hard Times.

    Pacino and Nicholson for Best Actor...what a toss-up. I wouldn't be mad with either choice.

    Dude, Do You Know Where You're Going has gotta win Best Song. I mean, Diana F'in Ross at her best!

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    1. That's an incredible ballot!

      I haven't seen Hard Times...now I wish I had!

      I really liked Do You Know Where You're Going (despite Mahogany being...an unfortunate film) but it was always going to be between I'm Easy and My Idaho Home, which are two of the most meaningful moments in Nashville.

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  6. It's funny. I just did my Blind Spot post on Dr. Strangelove (a Kubrick I LOVE), and, in my first paragraph, I pretty much bash Barry Lyndon (a Kubrick that lulled me to sleep every five minutes). Granted, I should probably see it again, and granted, it is technically perfect (at least what I saw of it), but just...

    I'll be back when I gather my thoughts about '75. I need to give it due diligence.

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    1. You're not alone in your dislike of Barry Lyndon, as you can see from Joel's response, but for me Barry Lyndon is Kubrick's true masterpiece. It's a spellbinding piece of cinema that is a glorious blend of cinema and literature and just feels so organic and pure. I love every lavishly dressed moment.

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    2. Okay, Drew. I'm back...finally. I realized my viewing of 1975 is actually sadly lacking. I could in no way get into specifics with you about any category other than Best Picture, which, for me, is something like this:

      Dog Day Afternoon
      Jaws
      Nashville
      One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
      Picnic at Hanging Rock

      Here's where it gets tough, and I agree on '75 being a great year! I love all of those films, nearly equally, and could name them a winner any day. Alas, I have to go with the one I find most important, the one I would prefer to watch any day of the week, and that film is Jaws. It's simply one of the most entertaining movies ever made, and it's totally crazy it even got made and was allowed to be as good as it is.

      I will one day watch Barry Lyndon again.

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    3. GREAT top 5. Jaws would also be my winner of your five. It's just an iconic piece of cinema and well worth all the praise and lasting attention it's received.

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  7. You and I have very different views on Barry Lyndon. I've seen everything Kubrick did starting with The Killers, and I think Lyndon is the one I'm least likely to watch a second time. I won't deny it's well made; I just don't care.

    I should come completely clean here and also admit that I'm one of those Philistines who would rather watch virtually anything (Salo and Vinyl excluded) before sitting down with Jeanne Dielmann again. In my experience, only Bresson was capable of filming nothing or repetative actions in an interesting way.

    Three Days of the Condor is absolutely worth your time.

    I'm still a little surprised I liked Nashville as much as I did.

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    1. Oh, and Rollerball. Everyone forgets the 1975 Rollerball, and they shouldn't. John Houseman deserved a supporting nom for it at the very least. I like what Jewison did with it as well.

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    2. LOL, I feel like the only Barry Lyndon supporter. Josh needs to hurry up and get over here, as I know it's his BP winner also!

      And I couldn't bring myself to watch Salo.

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    3. UGH, I knew I missed something. I had placed Rollerball in my queue and for some reason I think I moved it down, I don't know, because I got to the end of my 1975 movies and forgot all about it, but it's still there...like 20 movies down from where it was supposed to be!

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    4. Rollerball is an intriguing film. It puts forth lots of interesting ideas that were ahead of its time. It just doesn't quite live up to its potential...for me, anyway. I always see it as a very good movie that should've been great.

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    5. It has to be better than that 2002 remake with...Chris Klein!!!

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    6. Most things are better than the 2002 remake. I find Jewison's direction really interesting. It's a little slow in the middle, but I like the story a lot, and it's got a nice (if small) supporting role from Moses Gunn. I admit, I probably like it more than I should.

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    7. I'll definitely need to check it out!

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    8. Almost everything is better than the 2002 remake.

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  8. I saw Barry Lyndon for the first time recently at the cinema, the experience wasn't great to be honest. The seating was flat, I had ti crane my neck to look at the screen and a women's head was in the way. Three hours of this was very uncomfortable but I do agree with Kubrick being awarded Best Director, it was designed and direction to every inch.

    "The 70's get knocked around a lot as being a decade of films that...feel very dated, and I get that. There was a lot of politically centered films that feel very much 'a part of the times' and sometimes those particular films can be hard to embrace in a more modern setting, but this year is just so full of riches of all genres."

    Whilst true, I've always got the impression that people regarded the 70s as the greatest decade of all time

    Also glad you went for Jaws a best original score, you don't need to see the shark because the music is perfect to suggest the presence of a shark

    I do question Louise Fletcher in the supporting role, why is she not in the leading nominations?

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    1. I don't think any movie viewed in that scenario would be...fun, but I'm glad you at least appreciate the film for what it brings technically.

      I've been hearing a lot of 70's hate lately, but you could be right.

      I have always considered Fletcher to be supporting. She does not have very much screen time and she's used as a rather one-note (albeit iconic note) antagonist who is there to serve the progression of the film's only true lead, Nicholson.

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  9. Holy shit!!! You're cranking these out dude xD I always thought '75 seemed kinda drowsy compared the rest of the 70s for some reason. I think my BP would be for Adele H. Barry Lyndon was beautiful and O'Neal would probably get best actor from me but once again, the pacing hurts it so much for me :c I hear Amarcord's good, and I wanna watch The Mirror and Uzale, but I feel apprehension towards them for some reason...

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    1. The Mirror was easily my #2 and will rank very high for me when I redo my Top 100 list.

      Didn't you love Picnic at Hanging Rock?

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    2. You're right I do xD Okay scratch Adele, Picnic gets my BP, and maybe one of the girls for supporting actress. Dunno who xD Also I did an awards prediction for this year... Of my own awards. XD

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    3. I haven't had a chance to look yet. I'll comment when I do.

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    4. Hey Drew when's your birthday? I wanna start memorizing my friends birthdays and not rely on reminders lol

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    5. I don't make a thing of it, so no need to remember it ;-)

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    6. He lives! xD btw I've been updating my predictions ;)

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    7. Cool. I was out of town. Just got back last night. I'll check them out soon.

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    8. Oh nice! Hope you enjoyed yourself haha

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    9. Great! :) I'm not sure if I wanna see Birth of a Nation or not lol, looks gorgeous tho!

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    10. Trailer is cut nicely, but word on the street is that it is not as well made as it appears (very amateur) and Nate Parker is a disgusting rapist, so I won't be supporting his film. Shame, because the rest of the cast (and the story itself) deserves better than him.

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    11. I guess so... *sigh* btw you heard of Criswell? He does these fantastic video essays and analysis, and he did one on Tarkovsky recently I thought you'd like :)

      https://youtu.be/ak6rI-j07QU

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    12. I'll have to check it out.

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    13. Спасибо for the comment xD And I put Legend in this year cos only saw it this year xD But who knows, it'll probably be different come December, and I CANNOT wait to see Nocturnal Animals! It looks like Gone Girl by way of Kubrick, how can you get better than that?! XD

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    14. Yeah, Nocturnal Animals looks great.

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    15. Hi! I saw recently Nocturnal Animals and it's more like Blue Velvet and Funny Games rather than Gone Girl. Gyllenhaal is fantastic as usual, but Shannon and Taylor-Johnson stole the show for me! Adams is very good, moreover in the last scene which I won't spoil, but shes not at the same level of the other males. Linney has a nice one-scene wonder but not so great as reviews tell. Of course both cinematography and score are fantastic.

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    16. Thanks for the news! I thought it looked very Lynch, so I'm very intrigued by the comparisons you made.

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    17. I just watched The Witch. Dang...

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    18. Haven't seen it...I'm not usually into that kind of thing.

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    19. To each his own, I think Josh liked it too. Also yay you liked my '94 awards xP And as for the acting choices, nostalgic sentimentality I guess xD We used to camping a lot when I was kid, and we had this little portable DVD player we'd bring, and Legends Of The Fall was a movie we always brought with us lol. btw did ya see I kinda re-did my '92 awards?

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    20. I believe he did, as did Sati and most every other blogger I know (minus Connor, I think)...but those satanic-esque stories just don't do much for me.

      I understand sentimentality...I have a few noms/wins that could be attributed to that as well.

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    21. Hey dude what's the most joyful movie you know? I wanna cheer a friend up.

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    22. Joyful, huh...

      That's hard, solely because I don't usually watch films that are...technically joyful. Like, there are many films that make me smile, but there is usually an element of tragedy involved. Like, The Purple Rose of Cairo is one of those movies that warms my heart and makes me smile, but it's not an overtly 'joyful' films since it does deal with unhappy marriage but it deals with it in a very jovial-esque way. The Kid (Chaplin's, not Willis's) also makes me smile ear to ear, but it also makes me cry.

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    23. I think of stuff like Amelie and the Coen Bros movies. City Lights! I love City Lights :) I've never seen Cairo, but I've heard amazing things about it! Never seen The Kid either, but I heard it was just kinda sad. We're gonna go see The Girl On The Train this morning, but I'm worried it's gonna to much of a Gone Girl rip off...

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    24. Reviews make it out to be awful...and not very joyful ;-)

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    25. Emily Blunt and Haley Bennet were amazing and I'm calling their nominations now! (they'll definitely be getting some from me ;)) And the cinematography was pretty good looking too, but yeah, most everything else was kinda blah.

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    26. Calling their nominations for what...your personal awards? Because Oscar is NOT happening...at all...like, AT ALL.

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    27. Both Oscar and my awards XD What makes ya say it won't?

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    28. Short answer: She doesn't have strong enough reviews.

      Long answer: She's in a trashy pulp movie that got meh reviews at best and in order to break in with that kind of a flick, you need raves (look at Pike). She's in a very crowded field, with Stone and Portman garnering career best raves and LOCKED in for noms/potential wins as well as Adams with two films getting her incredible ink (for her AND the films) as well as Davis (who has an incredible narrative) and Bening (who pundits think is a massive threat), not to mention Negga (with RAVES out of Cannes and a very topical film) and Huppert (also career best raves and a career that begs to be rewarded) and there just is ZERO room for Blunt in a film no one cares about.

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    29. At this point, my actress race is probs gonna be: Davis, Adams for Nocturnal, Huppert, Blunt, and Anya-Taylor Joy for the Witch, as for Oscar, I can see them dropping Benning and Negga cos while those were both good films that they were very good in (so I've heard) it seems like a lot of people have kinda forgotten about them and I haven't heard them getting talked about a lot as Oscar night draws closer, then again, who knows? Oscar works in mysterious ways~

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    30. Bening's traction is just beginning, to be honest. Her film hasn't even opened yet (neither has Loving), but it recently screened and pundits are all over it for Oscar attention (especially for Bening and Gerwig).

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    31. Exciting! :) So what'd you say id the best film you've seen this year so far?

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    32. 1) Swiss Army Man
      2) The Nice Guys
      3) The Lobster
      4) Demolition
      5) Love & Friendship

      I still have a TON to see, but I genuinely loved all five of those films.

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    33. Iiiiiiiiiiiiiiii haven't seen any of those :T I'm gonna watch Don't Breath tomorrow and I watched The Dressmaker today, it was really good and is my fave this year so far :) I'm gonna try and look into Lobster and Demolition as well.

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    34. Hope you catch them, and enjoy them.

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    35. Oh I bet I will! You NEED to see The Dressmaker! It's Kate Winslet's best work in years xD And Judy Davis is like the best thing ever in it :D Also I just realized those movies are all comedies hehe. I guess I'll look at Love & Friendship first ;)

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    36. Yeah...I mean, The Lobster is a very BLACK comedy, and Demolition is more like a drama with comedic touches, but I guess you could say that.

      I very much look forward to seeing The Dressmaker!

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    37. And I very much look forward to a well worded and detailed review!

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    38. Gonna check out The Nice Guys today, I'll let you know what I think :P

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    39. One of my saddest realizations is that this year looks too crowded with male contenders unseen to allow both Crowe and Gosling to stay in my top 5...because they are an incredible team, and if I handed the award out based on collective performance they'd probably sail through to a win.

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  10. Excellent work! Can’t understand the hate for Barry Lyndon, which is top tier Kubrick.

    Oh, I MUST see Dersu Uzala! Totally blanked on that one. (And I LOVE Kurosawa!) Great to see Jaws make the top 5. I wish I liked The Mirror and The Passenger more. I’m a fan, but I think Tarkovsky and Antonioni have been much better.

    Ronee Blakley!!! Ha, the fact the she wins 2 Fistis and 2 CinSpecs for Nashville is amazing. I doubt that ever happens again.

    Tommy is another one I need to watch. And I’ve no idea how I overlooked Richard Dreyfuss.

    Pacino wins! We’re only 2/5, but your Best Actor lineup is great.

    Jaws wins Score! SO deserved.

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    1. Yeah, Barry Lyndon is...like...masterful.

      YOU MUST SEE DERSU UZALA!!! I think you'll love it. Such a brilliant piece of cinema. I wish you loved The Mirror and The Passenger more as well. The Mirror will rank rather high when I redo my Top 100 Films post.

      I couldn't NOT award Blakley. She was just tremendous...so heartfelt and honest and just raw to the bone, and her song...UGH...all the honest to goodness feels!

      Tommy is a mess, but a fun one, and those two supporting performances are killer. Dreyfuss is just aces in Jaws...LOVE HIM!!!

      Lead Actor was a pretty great category, but that top 5 have been my top 5 for YEARS and despite seeing a slew more movies before compiling this, it never wavered.

      That score...iconic to a T!

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  11. Ha, it's the year I was born [yep I'm THAT old] :P

    I haven't seen many of these but the kudos for JAWS isn't surprising, for sure that John Williams' score is iconic!

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    1. You are NOT old!!!

      Young at heart is all that matters :-D

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  12. What hurts most about these awards is the lack of Romy Schneider's incredible performance in L'important c'est d'aimer. It is an absolutely ESSENTIAL performance. Klaus Kinski also gives a shockingly restrained supporting performance in that movie that I love.

    I know I've seen at least part of Barry Lyndon a long time ago, because I remember thinking "...what is this? It's GORGEOUS!" and then about ten minutes later turning it off because it felt so airless - stuffy and rigid. I probably owe it rewatch with older, more trained eyes, but... I dunno.... Ryan O'Neal has only rarely done anything for me.

    Tim Curry, on the other hand, has always done something for me, and he is deserving of every award in the world for his no-holds-barred, outrageously brave performance in Rocky Horror. Sarandon is lovely, too, but not nom-worthy for me.

    I ADORE your nom for Ann-Margaret - she's so ballsy and committed in Tommy, which is a WEIRD fucking movie. The only things I really remember from it, though, are Ann-Margaret and Tina Turner's Acid Queen.

    No love for The Stepford Wives at all? Or Maximillian Schell in The Man in the Glass Booth?

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    1. I...have never heard of this movie you speak and now I feel the need to seek it out!!!

      Barry Lyndon is the work of the gods and I refuse to defend it further. It is absolute cinematic perfection.

      Curry...GOD BLESS this incredible performance...same with Ann-Margaret (and Reed)...because...just balls to the mutha f**in wall!!!

      Also...Stepford Wives and Man in the Glass Booth were not available. I tried...but Netflix had them at 'VERY LONG WAIT' and I got impatient.

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    2. WAIT. You haven't seen The Stepford Wives?!?!? OMG SEE IT IMMEDIATELY (also, screw Netflix)!

      But, ya know, see L'important c'est d'aimer first. It's incredible. Andrzej Zulawski is a formidable filmmaker. Have you seen any of his other stuff? Possession, or On The Silver Globe, or Diabel, or La Femme Publique? He is kind of amazing - I think this is probably his most "accessible" film (such as these things go), which is to say it still has the very in-your-face style of his but a more relatable storyline/characters than his other stuff. I'm DYING to know what you think of it, especially Schneider, who seriously does, like, All-Time Great work in it.

      Man in the Glass Booth isn't GREAT, but Schell is fucking TREMENDOUS.

      My Best Picture line-up for this year would be: Amarcord, Grey Gardens, L'important c'est d'aimer, Monty Python and the Holy Grail, and The Stepford Wives, with either of the first two winning. Cuckoo's Nest and Jaws I don't LOVE quite as much as I feel like I should, and Rocky Horror is... just a whole other thing entirely. Hester Street, which I just saw at Film Forum, would probably be my sixth place. What a lovely film, and Carol Kane is a total WOW.

      I (sadly) haven't seen most of the other major players of this year.

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    3. I looked up L'important c'est d'aimer and saw that it was released in the US in 1977...so I'll throw it on my list of films to see when compiling my 77 Fisti Awards (the luxury of having such fluid rules when it comes to foreign films).

      I have seen Possession, which made some waves in my 81 Fistis.

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    4. OOOOOOOOOH, I look forward to seeing where it turns up in that list, then! ENJOY IT!

      ...and let me know if you have trouble getting your hands on a copy. I'd be more than happy to help you out. :)

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