Thursday, December 18, 2014

Hack my shit!

You win.
I haven't said anything about the Sony hack here.  I wasn't sure if I was going to.  I mean, I try and address important cinematic/celebrity news, and yet this is the heart of awards season and there are more important things to talk about (or not as important but more time consuming).  Still, we all have an opinion, obviously, and sometimes it's good to just spit it out.  It's not like we haven't addressed controversial topics here before.  I've weighed in on the fappening and the Woody scandal.  I might as well weigh in on North Korea's complete and total domination of Hollywood.

So, when the hack first started it was all fun and games, right?  We all laughed at the shade thrown at the Smith family and those scathing emails about Angelina Jolie (like, OMG), but then things got serious; death threat serious.  

We've known for a while now that The Interview was causing trouble.  North Korea issued a statement months ago that if the film were released they'd consider it an act of war.  We all laughed that off, because, well, it was silly.  I mean, it's a buddy comedy starring Seth Rogen and James Franco.  Who cares, right?  North Korea cares, and they obviously cared enough (allegedly) to threaten 9/11 style terrorist attacks on any theater that dared show this movie.  Sony initially left this up to individual theaters to decide whether or not they wanted to show the film, while they themselves canceled the premier.  

Then Sony did something that is dividing everyone; they pulled the movie from opening...anywhere.  Not only this, but they have no plans to release the movie on any format.

Now here's the thing; this is a really controversial move and one that is going to split the world.  It's also truly a no win situation for Sony, and Hollywood really, because no matter what decision was made at this point, it was going to reflect badly somehow.  I mean, everyone is up in arms now, saying that Sony has handed North Korea all the power and has set a horrific precedent now, basically telling the world that if you threaten violence you can get your way, and in one decision has kind of raped America of our free speech.  I get this.  I actually agree with this.  But let me ask you this; had they NOT pulled the film, and North Korea bombed even ONE theater, killing a slew of innocent people (even those not seeing The Interview, or even those who lived nearby), what would be our reaction?  Would we be berating Sony, condemning them for being so greedy they couldn't pull the film, calling them bloodguilty?

I think we would.

Here's the problem with this whole situation.  It's a no-win.  Sony will always be the bad guys here because, no matter what their decision, they crossed a line we aren't cool with.  With the decision they made, they declared to the world that our free speech isn't worth fighting for, but if they had gone the other way, they would have declared that our lives aren't worth fighting for.  I ask you; what's more important?

I honestly ask that, because I'm on the fence.

Some are saying the film never should have been made.  I don't agree.  I actually think the idea for the film was genius and I give full props to Rogen and Franco and Sony for having the balls to even attempt this.  Some have said if North Korea did the reverse (a film about killing Obama) then we'd be up in arms and would see it as a terrorist threat.  I like to think that that would not happen.  For a country and is so devoted to the freeness of our speech, I can't see how this would have happened.  I find absolutely no reason for North Korea to feel as they do about this (I mean, it is so clearly a joke...like SO CLEARLY) but some people just don't possess a sense of humor (and, well, we already knew that was going to be a problem).  That said, I find this whole situation very sad for all involved.

But, like, seriously...don't you REALLY want to see this movie now?

12 comments:

  1. My simple opinion is that they shouldn't have used Kim Jong-un's name. I've always felt uncomfortable with that. They could have just switched up the name a little bit, even if it's still blatantly obvious who the person is supposed to be. That's what satires have been doing for ages.

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    1. I can see this, and that could have been a simple solution, but even if they had done that, I still think Kim Jong-un would have been furious.

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  2. I was supposed to see this film for Cinema Axis this month to review. Fucking hackers. Now, I want to see it more than ever as a big fuck you to them and to Sony for being pussies.

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    1. I'm really surprised this hasn't already become the most circulated bootleg movie of all time.

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  3. The biggest difference is that if some other country made a film about killing Obama, The U.S wouldn't be threatening with terrorist attacks. I mean Jesus, doesn't Ted Nugget or some other ultra conservatives already fantasize about killing him already? On American soil even? That's why I don't think that particular argument is a good one.

    They could've went the route of The Great Dictator and changed his name. I'm actually shocked they had the balls to not do that. But I don't think Sony should've caved. If North Korea attacked a cinema, that would be terrible, but it wouldn't be Sony's fault. It would be theirs for being fucking crazy. No lives should be lost over a movie.

    It's a sticky situation, but I think overall it's making the U.S look kind silly, don't you think? Even Paramount is blocking theaters from re-showing Team America now.

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    1. Oh, I agree. This whole situation is kind of a no-win, and not that I think it would be Sony's fault if a theater was bombed, but I highly believe they would be blamed. I mean, that's kind of what we do...blame.

      That said, I don't think North Korea is that dumb to actually pursue war over a fucking movie. Like...WTF. They would have never actually done it (like, they couldn't even if they did want to), so that is why I find this cave so ridiculous. They are caving over empty threats.

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    2. I agree with this. I do think that someone should have had enough brains to not use his actual name when they were making it. However, that ship has sailed. They should have released it as planned and trusted in those that protect our freedoms.

      Fo what its worth, I'm sure we wouldn't threaten terrorist attacks if a movie were made about killing Obama. That said, I'm positive every news show would have pundits on everyday for a month talking about it and arguing over what action Obama should take in response. Yes, some would be calling for a military response. You know, that's just what we do.

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    3. Yeah, there would be some rumbling, but not to this effect, for sure.

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  4. I'm on the fence as well. Both sides for and against Sony's decision have valid arguments. At least it appears we will see the film at some point now.

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  5. Of course I am waaaaaaaay behind in my blogging due to a little thing called Christmas but when they took the film away, I thought, honestly, "What is Sony up to?" There is no such thing as bad publicity. Now I don't believe Sony thought North Korea would go this far and so they took the film away and then saw all the negative remarks from this. I have a feeling, the executroids thought about this and thought this will build curiosity so no they are bringing it to a few select theatres and through the Internet. Censorship, of any kind, is frightening because it starts off with something that we can all agree may be in bad taste but it never stops there. The greed for power and control can take over and before one realizes, great works are being censored or history is being rewritten. My mom remembers books being burned by the Nazis and she hid some of her books. It started with pornography etc... but it did not stop and she never forgot this. Freedom of thought and to make one's own decision is paramount and my mom was a strong believer in Freedom since she had to escape to find it (from the Russians). If there was nothing said about this flick, I have a feeling it would have come and gone and that would have been it. If Sony gave the green light to film it, then stick by it. You are right, they would have been doomed either way but they knew what they were doing.

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    1. Yeah, once we lose our freedom of expression, then it's a dark and steady decline into oblivion. I mean, look at North Korea!

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