Tuesday, June 17, 2014

It's all in the details: my visual reviews of Jane Campion...


So, I'm finally ready to post another batch of these.  If you aren't familiar with these, I started this back in October of 2012 when I participated in a blogathon reviewing the works of Darren Aronofsky.  I realize that I had seen all of his works except Pi, which I had on my DVR, and so I decided to digest it quickly and review his entire body of work.  Well, reviewing an entire director's filmography is hard, and so I devised a way to do so without killing myself.  That is when Visual Reviews were born.  In other words, I take five images from each film in their filmography and use those images (and a description) to describe (or review) the film.

So far, the directors that I've done this for include:

Daren Aronofsky (also Noah, which was reviewed separately)
Wes Anderson (Grand Budapest Hotel to come soon)

So, now it's time to look at the works of Jane Campion.  As you can see, I've selected directors whose body of work shows strong visual flare and identity, and Campion is no exception.  All of these directors, while wildly different, have one thing in common; they know how to use images to get their points across.

Be forewarned...there is some sexual content after the jump.

So let's take a look at Campion's work*, from then to now.
*just as a small note, I only review theatrical work, so her television work will not be included


Sweetie (1989) *****/*****

Deceptively self aware...

Seemingly off-kilter, but marvelously grounded...

Brash...

Utilizes every deliberate crack...

What the fuck is going on?

An Angel at My Table (1990) ****/*****

Perceptive...

A long journey...

Has a lot to ponder...

Welcoming...

Floats on effortlessly...

The Piano (1993) *****/*****

Shamelessly harsh...

Dives right in...

A beautiful dance...

Curiously tempered...

Emotes sharp longing...

The Portrait of a Lady (1996) *****/*****

Painfully perceptive...

Poetically personal...

Outwardly standoffish...

Unapologetic...

Beautiful remorse...

Holy Smoke (1999) **/*****

"Look at me, look at me!"

A little too obvious...

A stench of desperate reaching...

I'm sorry...I feel a bit distracted...what were you saying?

Something was lost in the details...


In the Cut (2003) ***/*****

A total contradiction...
Disinterested...

Completely satisfying...


Caught up in the details...

It's all good...

Bright Star (2009) *****/*****

Soft as the kiss of death...

Dripping with romance...

Rests so easy, so calm...

Otherworldly wonderment...

Pressed into my heart forever...

8 comments:

  1. Lovely posts, these screenshots are beautiful! I wasn't a fan of Portrait of a Lady and Bright Star but at least they were a feast for the eyes.

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    1. They truly were. Even those who don't love her work can't deny that her films are stunning to look at. She puts a lot of thought into the framing of all of her scenes.

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  2. Jane Campion is a true artiste. She is one of the best out there as I widely recommend Top of the Lake as it's one of the best mini-series ever as it has a lot of her visual language and her themes. The Piano is my favorite film of hers so far as you can check out the rest in this list.

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    1. Couldn't agree more. I'll have to check out her mini-series for sure, and her shorts! I've only seen her theatrical work, but I'm interested in seeing everything. LOVE HER!

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  3. Oh man, I really need to see Sweetie and An Angel at My Table! Brilliant work, as always. Campion's films are gorgeous, for sure.

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    1. Sweetie is so strangely wonderful. My wife HATED it, but she couldn't stop watching it...it just pulls you in.

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  4. Great post! I absolutely love The Piano.

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    1. I'm totally with you. The Piano kind of has a mini sweep with the Fistis in 1993. I love it so much!

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